Patient Profiles

US data for animal bites range from 1 million to 4.5 million a year; cat and dog bites result in 334,000 emergency room (ER) visits annually.1

Kaitlin McGowan*

Age: 6

Location: Roswell, Georgia

Incident: Kaitlin was playing in the front yard of her suburban home when approached by an unfamiliar dog with no identifying tags. She was bitten shortly after the encounter.

Diagnosis: When Kaitlin and her father arrived at the hospital, he informed the attending physician that:

  • The patient had not been previously vaccinated
  • The animal could not be located

Treatment: The doctor thoroughly cleansed the wound and gave Kaitlin a rabies vaccine and a dose of rabies immune globulin (HyperRAB S/D® [rabies immune globulin (human)]).

Outcome: Thanks to the comprehensive treatment she received, Kaitlin went right back to playing outside and enjoying life.

Rabies virus exposure may not be from a bite; exposure to an infected animal's saliva through a mucus membrane or open skin can put you at risk.2

Willis Governson*

Age: 54

Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Incident: Willis, a postal worker, had a week off from work and decided to clean the attic. While he was digging into some boxes, a bat making unusual noises flew out. Willis threw his hands up to protect his face. The bat managed to escape through an open window. Although he didn't think the bat scratched him, he wasn't sure. Willis remembered reading a pamphlet from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on bats and rabies, and the CDC recommendation is to seek emergency care if you have had exposure to a bat. Since the bat could not be brought in for testing, Willis decided he needed to go to the emergency room.

Diagnosis: When Willis and his daughter arrived at the hospital, he informed the attending physician that:

  • He had not been previously vaccinated
  • The animal could not be located

Treatment: The doctor thoroughly cleansed the wound and gave Willis a rabies vaccine and a dose of rabies immune globulin (HyperRAB S/D).

Outcome: Thanks to the comprehensive treatment he received, Willis was able to finish the job he started and enjoy his vacation.

Rabies vaccine and HyperRAB® S/D (rabies immune globulin [human]) should be given to all persons suspected of exposure to rabies with one exception: persons who have been previously immunized with rabies vaccine and have a confirmed adequate rabies antibody titer should receive only vaccine. HyperRAB S/D should be administered as promptly as possible after exposure, but can be administered up to the eighth day after the first dose of vaccine is given.

HyperRAB S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

The attending physician who wishes to administer HyperRAB S/D to persons with isolated immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency must weigh the benefits of immunization against the potential risks of hypersensitivity reactions. Such persons have increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with all preparations administered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

Soreness at the site of injection and mild temperature elevations may be observed at times. Sensitization to repeated injections has occurred occasionally in immunoglobulin-deficient patients. Angioneurotic edema, skin rash, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock have rarely been reported after intramuscular injection so that a causal relationship between immunoglobulin and these reactions is not clear.

Administration of live virus vaccines (e.g., MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after rabies immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperRAB S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperRAB S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


References:

  1. Animal bite infections. Encyclopedia of Children's Health website. http://www.healthofchildren.com/A/Animal-Bite-Infections.html. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How is rabies transmitted? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/transmission/index.html. Updated April 22, 2011. Accessed April 11, 2016.