Patient Profiles

According to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30% of reported tetanus cases that were treated were in elderly persons aged 65 or older.1

June Livingston*

Age: 73

Location: Providence, Rhode Island

Incident: June is retired, but she competes every year in her town's rose garden contest. While tending to her garden, June got distracted and cut herself. Concerned about the severity of her injury, fearing she would need stitches, and having just learned that tetanus was more than stepping on a rusty nail, June went to the emergency room (ER).

Diagnosis: When June arrived at the ER, the attending physician noted that she:

  • Had a deep laceration
  • Was unable to recall if she had ever received a tetanus vaccination

Treatment: Once June's uncertain immunization status was confirmed, the doctor removed the source of the infection through debridement and used an antimicrobial (eg, metronidazole). The doctor then gave June a dose of tetanus immune globulin (HyperTET S/D) in conjunction with a tetanus vaccine.

Outcome: Thanks to the comprehensive treatment she received, June went on to win her town's rose garden competition in good health.

One study showed that 75.3% of immigrants (those not born in North America or Western Europe) who were treated in an ER had significantly lower quantities of tetanus antibodies.2

Miguel Hernandez*

Age: 30

Location: San Diego, California

Incident: Miguel runs a very profitable construction company in California. They had just begun a new job but were short staffed, so Miguel stepped in. While working, Miguel's hand slipped, and he cut himself with a power saw. Because he makes all of his employees take a safety class before starting any job, Miguel knew that his injury was severe and also prone to infections, including tetanus. He decided that an ER visit was necessary.

Diagnosis: When Miguel arrived at the ER, the attending physician noted that he:

  • Had a deep laceration
  • Had not had his primary series of vaccinations because he had not been born in North America or Western Europe

Treatment: The doctor removed the source of the infection through debridement, used an antimicrobial (eg, metronidazole), and then gave Miguel a dose of tetanus immune globulin (HyperTET S/D) in conjunction with a tetanus vaccine.

Outcome: Thanks to the comprehensive treatment he received, Miguel went on to finish the job and is back to running his company.

HyperTET® S/D (tetanus immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prophylaxis against tetanus following injury in patients whose immunization is incomplete or uncertain.

HyperTET S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

In patients who have severe thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder that would contraindicate intramuscular injections, HyperTET S/D should be given only if the expected benefits outweigh the risks.

Slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation may be noted at times. Sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare. In the course of routine injections of large numbers of persons with immunoglobulin, there have been a few isolated occurrences of angioneurotic edema, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock after injection. Administration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after tetanus immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperTET S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses and theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperTET S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


References:

  1. Tiwari TSP. Chapter 16: Tetanus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/surv-manual/chpt16-tetanus.html. Updated April 1, 2014. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  2. Talan DA, Abrahamian FM, Moran GJ, et al. Tetanus immunity and physician compliance with tetanus prophylaxis practices among emergency department patients presenting with wounds. Ann Emerg Med. 2004;43(3):305-314.