Reimbursement Process and Coding Information for Hypermunes™

Information on Grifols Hypermunes Reimbursement Process

Both private and government payers process and reimburse claims for Hypermunes when they are administered in approved care facilities, such as emergency departments, hospital outpatient departments, physician offices, and local health departments. Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Affairs (VA), and Tricare for the Department of Defense (DoD) represent the major government payers. Most private and commercial payers administer benefits through Managed Care Organizations (MCOs), which are primarily employer-based.

Coding for Grifols Hypermunes

When submitting claims to third-party payers, providers should accurately code the product and procedure.

  • Product Billing Code—Each of the Hypermunes has its own unique Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code or Current Procedural Terminology® (CPT)* code as shown below
  • Injection Procedure—In addition to the code that identifies the agent, the injection procedure has a CPT code. The administration CPT code is 96372—therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic injection (specify substance or drug); subcutaneous or intramuscular

Hypermunes code + injection procedure code = complete reimbursement
Grifols Hypermunes product billing codes. For additional reimbursement information, please see reimbursement codes below:

HyperRAB® S/D (rabies immune globulin [human])

HyperRAB® S/D

HyperTET® S/D (tetanus immune globulin [human])

HyperTET® S/D

HyperRHO® S/D (RhO[D] immune globulin [human])

HyperRHO® S/D

HyperHEP® B S/D (hepatitis B immune globulin [human])

HyperHEP® B S/D

GamaSTAN® SD (immune globulin [human])

GamaSTAN® SD

Rabies vaccine and HyperRAB® S/D (rabies immune globulin [human]) should be given to all persons suspected of exposure to rabies with one exception: persons who have been previously immunized with rabies vaccine and have a confirmed adequate rabies antibody titer should receive only vaccine. HyperRAB S/D should be administered as promptly as possible after exposure, but can be administered up to the eighth day after the first dose of vaccine is given.

HyperRAB S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

The attending physician who wishes to administer HyperRAB S/D to persons with isolated immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency must weigh the benefits of immunization against the potential risks of hypersensitivity reactions. Such persons have increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with all preparations administered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

Soreness at the site of injection and mild temperature elevations may be observed at times. Sensitization to repeated injections has occurred occasionally in immunoglobulin-deficient patients. Angioneurotic edema, skin rash, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock have rarely been reported after intramuscular injection so that a causal relationship between immunoglobulin and these reactions is not clear.

Administration of live virus vaccines (e.g., MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after rabies immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperRAB S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperRAB S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


HyperTET® S/D (tetanus immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prophylaxis against tetanus following injury in patients whose immunization is incomplete or uncertain.

HyperTET S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

In patients who have severe thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder that would contraindicate intramuscular injections, HyperTET S/D should be given only if the expected benefits outweigh the risks.

Slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation may be noted at times. Sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare. In the course of routine injections of large numbers of persons with immunoglobulin, there have been a few isolated occurrences of angioneurotic edema, nephrotic syndrome, and anaphylactic shock after injection. Administration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after tetanus immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperTET S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses and theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperTET S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


HyperRHO® S/D Mini-Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin [human]) is recommended to prevent the isoimmunization of RhO(D) negative women at the time of spontaneous or induced abortion of up to 12 weeks' gestation provided the following criteria are met:

  1. The mother must be RhO(D) negative and must not already be sensitized to the RhO(D) antigen.
  2. The father is not known to be RhO(D) negative.
  3. Gestation is not more than 12 weeks at termination.

HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

NEVER ADMINISTER HYPERRHO S/D MINI-DOSE INTRAVENOUSLY. INJECT ONLY INTRAMUSCULARLY. ADMINISTER ONLY TO WOMEN POSTABORTION OR POSTMISCARRIAGE OF UP TO 12 WEEKS' GESTATION. NEVER ADMINISTER TO THE NEONATE.

HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immune globulin preparations.

The attending physician who wishes to administer HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose to persons with isolated immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency must weigh the benefits of immunization against the potential risks of hypersensitivity reactions. Such persons have increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with all preparations administered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

Although systemic reactions to immunoglobulin preparations are rare, epinephrine should be available for treatment of acute anaphylactic symptoms.

Other antibodies in the HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose preparation may interfere with the response to live vaccines such as measles, mumps, polio or rubella. Therefore, immunization with live vaccines should not be given within 3 months after HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose administration.

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose. It is also not known whether HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose is not indicated for use during pregnancy and it should be administered only postabortion or postmiscarriage.

Safety and effectiveness in the pediatric population have not been established.

Reactions to HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose are infrequent in RhO(D) negative individuals and consist primarily of slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation. While sensitization to repeated injections of human globulin is extremely rare, it has occurred.

Please see HyperRHO S/D Mini-Dose full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


HyperRHO® S/D Full Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prevention of Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and the prevention of isoimmunization in RhO(D) negative individuals who have been transfused with RhO(D) positive red blood cells.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is made from human plasma. Because this product is made from human plasma, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent.

Never administer HyperRHO S/D Full Dose intravenously. Inject only intramuscularly. Never administer to the neonate.

RhO(D) immune globulin (human) should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations. Such persons have increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with all preparations administered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

A large fetomaternal hemorrhage late in pregnancy or following delivery may cause a weak mixed field positive DU test result. If there is any doubt about the mother's Rh type, she should be given RhO(D) immune globulin (human). A screening test to detect fetal red blood cells may be helpful in such cases.

If more than 15 mL of D-positive red blood cells are present in the mother's circulation, more than a single dose of HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is required. Failure to recognize this may result in the administration of an inadequate dose.

Although systemic reactions to human immunoglobulin preparations are rare, epinephrine should be available for treatment of acute anaphylactic symptoms.

Administration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after RhO(D) immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose should be given in pregnant women only if clearly needed because animal reproduction studies have not been conducted.

Reactions to RhO(D) immune globulin (human) are infrequent in RhO(D)-negative individuals and consist primarily of slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation. While sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare, it has occurred.

Elevated bilirubin levels have been reported in some individuals receiving multiple doses of RhO(D) immune globulin (human) following mismatched transfusions. This is believed to be due to a relatively rapid rate of foreign red cell destruction.

Please see HyperRHO S/D Full Dose full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


HyperHEP® B S/D (hepatitis B immune globulin [human]) is indicated for postexposure prophylaxis in the following situations: acute exposure to blood containing HBsAg, perinatal exposure of infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers, sexual exposure to an HBsAg-positive person, and household exposure to persons with acute HBV infection.

HyperHEP B S/D should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations. Epinephrine should be available.

In patients who have severe thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder that would contraindicate intramuscular injections, hepatitis B immune globulin (human) should be given only if the expected benefits outweigh the risks.

Local pain and tenderness at the injection site, urticaria, and angioedema may occur; anaphylactic reactions, although rare, have been reported following the injection of human immunoglobulin preparations. Administration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after hepatitis B immune globulin (human) administration.

HyperHEP B S/D is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent that can cause disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products.

Please see HyperHEP S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


GamaSTAN® S/D (immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prophylaxis of hepatitis A infection, prevention or modification of measles (rubeola), and passive immunization against varicella in immunosuppressed patients, and also possibly for prophylaxis of rubella in early pregnancy (for women who will not consider a therapeutic abortion).

The prophylactic value of GamaSTAN S/D is greatest when given before or soon after exposure to hepatitis A. GamaSTAN S/D is not indicated in persons with clinical manifestations of hepatitis A or in those exposed more than 2 weeks previously.

GamaSTAN S/D should be given to prevent or modify measles in a susceptible person exposed fewer than 6 days previously. A susceptible person is one who has not been vaccinated and has not had measles previously. GamaSTAN S/D and measles vaccine should not be given at the same time.

Thrombosis may occur with immune globulin products, including GamaSTAN S/D. Risk factors may include: advanced age, prolonged immobilization, hypercoagulable conditions, history of venous or arterial thrombosis, use of estrogens, indwelling central vascular catheters, hyperviscosity, and cardiovascular risk factors. Thrombosis may occur in the absence of known risk factors. For patients at risk of thrombosis, do not exceed the recommended dose of GamaSTAN S/D. Ensure adequate hydration in patients before administration. Monitor for signs and symptoms of thrombosis and assess blood viscosity in patients at risk for hyperviscosity.

Do not give GamaSTAN S/D to persons with isolated immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency. Such persons have the potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could have anaphylactic reactions to subsequent administration of blood products that contain IgA.

Do not give GamaSTAN S/D to patients who have severe thrombocytopenia or any coagulation disorder that would contraindicate intramuscular injections.

Administer GamaSTAN S/D cautiously to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

GamaSTAN S/D is made from human plasma. Because GamaSTAN S/D is made from human blood, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, eg, viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent. No cases of transmission of viral diseases or CJD have ever been identified for GamaSTAN S/D.

Do not administer immune globulin (human) subcutaneously or intravenously because of the potential for serious reactions (eg, renal dysfunction/failure/hemolysis, transfusion-related acute lung injury [TRALI]). Do not inject into a blood vessel.

Do not perform skin tests. In most patients the intradermal injection of concentrated gamma globulin solution with its buffers causes a localized area of inflammation, which can be misinterpreted as a positive allergic reaction. In actuality, this does not represent an allergy; rather, it is localized tissue irritation of a chemical nature. Misinterpretation of the results of such tests can lead the physician to withhold beneficial human immunoglobulin from a patient who is not actually allergic to this material. Although true allergic responses to human gamma globulin given in the prescribed intramuscular manner are rare, have epinephrine available for treatment of acute allergic symptoms, should they occur.

Passive transfer of antibodies may transiently impair the immune responses to live attenuated virus vaccines such as mumps, rubella, and varicella for up to 6 months, and for a year or more to measles (rubeola). Inform the immunizing physician of recent therapy with GamaSTAN S/D so that appropriate precautions can be taken. No interactions with other products are known.

Local pain and tenderness at the injection site, urticaria, and angioedema may occur. Anaphylactic reactions, although rare, have been reported following the injection of human immune globulin preparations. Anaphylaxis is more likely to occur if GamaSTAN S/D is given intravenously; therefore, GamaSTAN S/D must be administered only intramuscularly.

Please see GamaSTAN S/D full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.